Why I became a Social Security Disability Lawyer – Raleigh, Cary and Durham, NC

Class Notes

Martin Mark Rosenbluth, of Hillsborough, N.C., was recognized by the Supreme Court of North Carolina and inducted into the N.C. Pro Bono Society for providing at least 50 hours of pro bono legal services during the 2016 calendar year. Matthew R. Kain, of Moore & Van Allen PLLC in Charlotte, N.C., was recognized by the Supreme Court of North Carolina and inducted into the N.C. Pro Bono Society for providing at least 50 hours of pro bono legal services during the 2016 calendar year. Lauren V. Lewis, of Essex Richards PA in Charlotte, N.C., was recognized by the Supreme Court of North Carolina and inducted into the N.C. Pro Bono Society for providing at least 50 hours of pro bono legal services during the 2016 calendar year. Matthew A. Cordell, of Raleigh, N.C., was recognized by the Supreme Court of North Carolina and inducted into the N.C. Pro Bono Society for providing at least 50 hours of pro bono legal services during the 2016 calendar year. Rew H. Erteschik, a partner at Poyner Spruill LLP in Raleigh, N.C., was recognized by the Supreme Court of North Carolina and inducted into the N.C. Pro Bono Society for providing at least 50 hours of pro bono legal services during the 2016 calendar year. Karen J. Adams, of McGuireWoods LLP in Charlotte, N.C., was recognized by the Supreme Court of North Carolina and inducted into the N.C. Pro Bono Society for providing at least 50 hours of pro bono legal services during the 2016 calendar year. Daniel Cornelus Gunter III, of Raleigh, N.C., was recognized by the Supreme Court of North Carolina and inducted into the N.C. Pro Bono Society for providing at least 50 hours of pro bono legal services during the 2016 calendar year. Shelia A. Huggins, of Durham, N.C., was recognized by the Supreme Court of North Carolina and inducted into the N.C. Pro Bono Society for providing at least 50 hours of pro bono legal services during the 2016 calendar year. Lonnie M. Player Jr., a partner at Player McLean, LLP in Fayetteville, N.C., was appointed by the N.C. State Bar Council to serve a six-year term on the N.C. Judicial Standards Commission. Christopher T. Graebe, a partner at Graebe Hanna & Sullivan in Raleigh, N.C., was recognized by the Supreme Court of North Carolina and inducted into the N.C. Pro Bono Society for providing at least 50 hours of pro bono legal services during the 2016 calendar year. Robert L. Mendenhall, a partner at Holland & Knight LLP, N.C., was recognized by the Supreme Court of North Carolina and inducted into the N.C. Pro Bono Society for providing at least 50 hours of pro bono legal services during the 2016 calendar year. Stephen M. Schoeberle, of Morganton, N.C., was recognized by the Supreme Court of North Carolina and inducted into the N.C. Pro Bono Society for providing at least 50 hours of pro bono legal services during the 2016 calendar year.

Keywords: [“NC”,”Carolina”,”North”]
Source: http://www.law.unc.edu/alumni/news/classnotes

Lenoir Family Papers, 1763-1940, 1969-1975

Letter of 5 January 1807 from Joseph Winston in Washington, D.C., to William Lenoir about the Burr conspiracy; ¢a letter of 24 February 1808 from Washington Norwood in Granville County, N.C., to William Lenoir about becoming involved in the European war;. In the 1837 letter, Thomas Lenoir explained to William Avery Lenoir, who had just sold his own slaves in Alabama and wondered what to do with those of Thomas who were in his care, that William was to ask the slaves whether or not they wanted to be sold. Family materials in the early years include many letters about family matters to William Lenoir from his brother Thomas Lenoir, but quickly expand to include letters to William Lenoir from his sons, chiefly William Ballard Lenoir and Thomas Lenoir, and among the women of the family. A letter of 1 February 1795 from William Ballard Lenoir to William Lenoir asking help in financing continuing education; ¢a letter of 31 October 1801 from Walter Raleigh Lenoir to his father about hating school, and one of 7 February 1806 indicating that Walter was being sent home from school;. Letters beginning 16 September 1806 from son Thomas Lenoir in Morganton, N.C., to William Lenoir about Thomas’s dissatisfaction with life at East Fork of Pigeon and continuing until Thomas moved his family to Fort Defiance around 1822; ¢a letter of 29 September 1807, from Mary Lenoir Davenport in Red Hill, N.C., to Thomas Lenoir’s wife Selina about Mary’s losing a child in a fire;. Many letters, beginning on 29 June 1810, from William Ballard Lenoir to father William Lenoir or brother Thomas Lenoir about life in Roane County, Tenn.;. A letter of 25 February 1817 from nephew Thomas Isaac Lenoir in Sumter District, S.C., to William Lenoir about the death of William’s brother Thomas Lenoir;. Letters in May and July 1817 from William Lenoir’s daughter Sarah Lenoir Jones in South Carolina to sister Eliza Mira Lenoir about her life with Thomas F. Jones, and one of 9 May 1820 in which Thomas Jones wrote of Sarah’s death; ¢a letter of 4 June 1819 in which William Ballard Lenoir instructed his son Albert at Greenville College, Tenn., about how to act in college;. Letters, beginning in August 1829, from Selina Louise, Laura, Sarah, and Walter Waightstill Lenoir, and from Julia Pickens at school in Salem or Hillsborough, N.C., to Selina Louisa Avery Lenoir and other relatives about school life;. Letters, beginning around February 1835, from Sarah Eveline Lenoir with Walter Raleigh Lenoir in Missouri about life in that state;. A letter of 20 June 1837 in which Selina Louisa Avery Lenoir gave an overview of the Avery family;. A letter of 13 May 1839 from Thomas Lenoir to William Ballard Lenoir informing William of the death of their father, and one of 21 March 1840 from William Avery Lenoir in Greene County, Ala., in which he lamented the fighting among family members over the division of William Lenoir’s property.

Keywords: [“Lenoir”,”letter”,”William”]
Source: http://finding-aids.lib.unc.edu/00426